Author Archives: Michal Falkowski

Our campus response to Violence Against Women Project

Albany Law School along with other members of a community-wide coalition and two other education institutions (Siena College and The College of Saint Rose), received a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Violence Against Women to support the launch of the Campus Response to Violence Against Women Project.

Click HERE for access to Albany Law School’s Harassment Policy. 

This highly innovative project aims to respond to violence against women through a multi-disciplinary and collaborative approach.  The Project is working  to build a culture on our campus where violence against women is not tolerated and seeks to support and empower student victims while holding offenders accountable.

Important components of this work are outreach and education to all studentsContinue reading

Sotomayor: first hispanic woman named to Supreme Court

As reported on www.cnn.com today, August 6:

“The U.S. Senate confirmed Judge Sonia Sotomayor, in a 68-31 vote, as the first Hispanic justice on the Supreme Court.    Nine Republicans backed her nomination. The 55-year-old federal appeals court judge becomes the 111th person to sit on the high court, and the third female justice. President Obama welcomed the vote, saying he has “great confidence” in Sotomayor.”

Sonia Sotomayor will be the first Hispanic on the Supreme Court if she is confirmed.

Legal sources said a White House swearing-in ceremony could happen as early as Saturday. Continue reading

9 Healthy ways to communicate

1. Reflect back what is being said. Use their words, not yours.

2. Begin where they are, not where you want them to be.

3. Be curious and open to what they are trying to say.

4. Notice what they are saying and what they are not.

5. Emotionally relate to how they are feeling. Nurture the relationship.

6. Notice how you are feeling. Be honest and authentic.

7. Take responsibility for your part in the conflict or misunderstanding.

8. Try to understand how their past affects who they are and how those experiences affect their relationship with you.

9. Stay with the process and the relationship, not just the solution.

Source: StirFry Seminars & Consulting, www. stirfryseminars.com

Albany Law welcomes Summer 2009 NY LEO Fellows to campus

On Wednesday, June 17th, the Diversity Office at Albany Law School will host the Summer 2009 NY Legal Education Opportunity (LEO) Fellows.  Fellows will enjoy a visit and guided tour of the NYS Court of Appeals prior to joining us for a student/alumni luncheon in their honor.        

Recently retired Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye has established the New York Legal Opportunity Program (NY LEO) to help ensure a diverse legal community by promoting academic success for individuals historically under-represented in the legal profession. The program assists minority, low-income and educationally disadvantaged college graduates in acquiring the fundamental and practical skills necessary to succeed in law school.  The program is available to qualified candidates who will attend law school in New York State this Fall.  This is an intensive six-week summer program (beginning June 8 – ending July 17) offered by the New York State Judicial Institute.   The Honorable Robert G.M. Keating, the Dean of the  NYS Judicial Institute, administers the program. Students are required to live on campus and participate in the program full-time. Experienced law professors will provide instruction in first-year law school core courses as well as in legal research, writing and analysis. As part of the program, students will have the opportunity to visit courts in session and meet with members of the judiciary and other legal professionals.

Albany Law School is committed to an educational environment that values, respects and reflects a global view of diversity.   Albany Law School support programs such as the New York Legal Education Opportunity Program and has been a member school in the national Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) summer program for the past decade.  These programs ensure that the legal community reflects the client-base and communities it serves. 

If you would like to join us for lunch from Noon-1pm in the Boardroom (in Building 2000) on Wednesday, June 17th or have questions regarding these students, contact Pershia Wilkins, Director of Diversity, at diversity@albanylaw.edu or (518)445-3284.   

Learn more about the fellows visit, Click Here  for agenda & see below photo gallery:

Law student commentary on Obama’s Policies; & New Federal Govt. Publication on Muslim Americans

On Saturday, May 30th, Albany Law School student Ali Chaudhry was invited for a media interview concerning President Obama’s policy on Pakistan/Afghanistan, and the current situation in Pakistan.  It was conducted by Mr. Vikram Chandra, the CEO of New Delhi TV (NDTV), India’s largest news network. The show is called “The Big Fight” which enjoys a viewership of 35 million. Continue reading

Albany Law School’s First Women Professors to Retire

The School’s first two female professors are retiring this year: Professor Sandra Stevenson, who graduated from Albany Law in 1971 and joined the faculty in 1974; and Professor Katheryn Katz, who was hired in 1975, and the first professor to hold the Kate Stoneman Chair in Law and Democracy.

Click HERE to view the bios of our current professors. 

Four years after joining the faculty as the lone woman, Stevenson served as the first director of Albany Law’s new Government Law Center, the first of its kind in the nation. She is also largely credited for Continue reading

Twenty-seven students received MS Degrees in Legal Studies

Twenty-seven MS  students were among the 255 students receiving 
degrees at Albany Law School’s 158th commencement ceremony on Friday, May 15th, 2009 at Saratoga Performing Arts Center (SPAC).   The Honorable Jonathan Lippman delivered the keynote address at the commencement ceremony, his first as Chief Judge of New York State.  Click Here for a Podcast of Chief Justice Lippman’s speech.    Continue reading