Second-year law student Dannaliz Mieses has always had an interest in international culture due to her experience with other cultures.  She speaks fluent English, Spanish, Portuguese and French.  After graduating from Fordham University with a degree in political science, she was keen on starting law school.

This past summer Mieses interned in Mexico City for Mexico’s Federal Economic Competition Commission. She worked in international affairs and the legal department, alongside economists and lawyers.

During her time at Fordham she volunteered as a group translator for an 18-day pilgrimage in Brazil.

These experiences — combining travel and multilingual skills – confirmed Mieses’ vision for her career path. “I felt that I was really able to give people a much more meaningful experience by translating the language for them,” she said. “I love being challenged and putting my language abilities to use.  Being put on the spot and having to think quickly is something I realize I really like.”

During her internship, Mieses caught more than a glimpse of high-level international corporate law activity, when she observed firsthand cases with major companies such as Uber and Delta Air Lines.  “I know now that being able to help people in their daily lives is something that really matters to me.”

One of Mieses’ responsibilities was translating a 25-page document from Spanish to English.  This document dealt with antitrust and anti-competition and was shared with English speaking countries all over the world.

“I also created a Ukraine competition policy summary for my supervisor to use for his presentation at the Federal Trade Commission in Washington D.C.,” she said.

She was responsible for managing a spreadsheet with young agencies from 120 jurisdictions in which she identified  their involvement in the International Competition Network. She drafted a regulation proposal from a comparative legal perspective involving financial technology in Mexico. And she performed research on substantive market power and oligopolies that was used for a large, complex case involving European air,petroleum and mineral companies the Commission was looking to sanction for anti-competition behavior in Mexico.

And she performed research on substantive market power and oligopolies that was used for a large, complex case involving European air,petroleum and mineral companies the Commission was looking to sanction for anti-competition behavior in Mexico.

This semester at Albany Law, Mieses is president of the International Law Society, where she hopes to bring excitement to the club with the Jessup International Moot Court competition and networking opportunities in New York City.

Through Project Totem she helps the Law School’s Immigration Law Clinic by interpreting client interviews and translating documents. When time allows she serves as a Spanish and French interpreter at the Immigration Court in New York City.

This fall she is a legal intern for the Community Development Clinic, where she expects to advise small businesses with legal challenges and gain transactional experience.

Her career goals: they are many, but ideally she hopes to work in cross-border international law in Latin America and Europe as well as eventually work for the United Nations, where she has previously volunteered. She is eager to gain solid legal experience while she works toward these career goals.